Teaching Unit Fundamental Coefficient: 3 Credit: 6 Level: Master II (Lit &Civ)   Weekly time: 1h30
References Bailing, Bernard. The Great Republic: A History of the American People. Vol. 2, Lexington Books, D.C. Heath, 1985 Billing Ton, Ray Allen, and Martin, Ridge. Westward Expansion, a History of American Frontier, 5th edition, New York, Macmillan, 1982 Brogan, Hugh. The Penguin History of the United States. New York, Longman Group, limited, 1985 Bryan, O’Callaghan. An Illustrated History of the United States of America. London, Longman, 2005 Buell, J. W. The Norse Discovery. Stokholm, Norrcena Society, 1906 Charles, R. Morris. The Dawn of Innovation: The First American Revolution, U.S.A. Tantor Media Inc, 2012 Dexter, Perkins. The New Age of Franklin Roosevelt 1932-1945, N.Y. University of Chicago Press, 1954 Dinner, Stein Leonard and Davis M. Reamers. Ethnic Americans: A History of Immigration and Assimilation, New York, Harper and Row, 1982 Fink, Gary M. Labor Unions, West Port, CT: Greenwood Press, 1977 Foner, Eric. The Story of American Freedom. New York, W.W. Norton and Company. Inc, 1988 Friedman, Michael. Jay, Free at Last: The US Civil Right Movement, A.J Cornell Publications, 2008 Gary, W. Gallagher. The Union War. Harvard University Press, 2011 Grant ,Susan-Mary .A Concise History of the United States of America, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, 2012 Howard, H. Pinkham. The War of the Independence, U.S.A. the University of Chicago Press, 1958 Hugh, Brogan. The Penguin History of the United States of America. Penguin, 2001 Jordan, Winthrop D.  Miriam GreenblattJohn S. Bowes. The Americans: A History. McDougal, Littell, 1991  Koltshin, Peter. American Slavery. 1619-1877. 10th anniversary edition, with a new preface and afterward, New York, Hill and Wang, 2003 Mc Master, Bach John. A Brief History of the United States. USA, Casino Classics, 2009 Melinda, Tims. Perspectives on the Making of Americans: An Introduction to US Civilization, Ellipses Marketing, 2002 Novak, Michael. The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism, New York, Simon and Schuster, 1982 Rimini, Robert. A Short History of the United States. Harper Collins Publishers Inc, New York, 2008 Smith, page. The Rise of Industrial America: A people’s History of the Post Reconstruction Era, New York, M.C. Rutledge, 2010 William, E. Lichtenburg. The Perils of Prosperity. U.S.A University of Chicago Press, 2006

Course Content

First Semester

Unit  1 : The Second World War 1939- 1945

Objectives

Students will

  1. Examine the nature of what Winston Churchill called the “Grand Alliance” between the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union in opposition to the aggression of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan.
  2. How did Democrat Franklin Delano Roosevelt lead the nation through the Second World War.
  3. How did Roosevelt build a powerful wartime coalition with Britain and the Soviet Union, and led the nation to victory against Nazi Germany.
  4. Investigate Roosevelt’s efforts which prepared the path for his successor, Harry Truman, to win the war against Japan four months after his death.

Unit 2  Post war Period                                  

Objectives

 Students will be able to find out:

The real  reasons behind the United States’ rebuilding the world after the second world war

Unit 3  Cold War                                

  Objectives

Students should be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the causes and timeline of the Cold War.
  2. Recognize the core conflict between Communism and Democracy/Capitalism.
  3. Critique how concern for Communism affected life in the United States.

 Unit 4 Korean  War                                          

 Objectives

Students will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) and the 38th parallel
  2. Discuss the countries and leaders involved in the Korean War
  3. Name two of the crucial battles of the Korean War
  4. Summarize the events that led to the Korean War

Unit 6 Adjustments of the 1950′

Objectives

Students will discover why America’s grand strategies have not changed: power, habit, and the U.S. Foreign Policy Establishment

Unit 7 Leadership of the 1960’s                                

 Objectives

Students will be able to:

  1. Consider what they know about the 60’s
  2. Identify significant issues and figures of the decade
  3. Identify resources for first and accounts of events
  4. Identify sources of information about the 1960s
  5. Understand that there were many issues, and many ways people expressed their different points of view

Unit 8The Vietnam War              

Objectives

Students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the cause of the Vietnam War.
  2. Explain the impact the war had on the United States and American society
  3. Discuss relevant events, legislation, and agreements as it relates to the Vietnam War.
  4. Describe how the war ended.

Unit 9 The Nixon Years                                   

Objectives

Students will:

  1. Learn about the Watergate scandal of 1972-1974 and the events that led to Nixon’s resignation.
  2. Discuss the reasons why Nixon’s leadership was known as an “Imperial Presidency.”
  3. Discuss issues such as executive privilege and think about how much Watergate has limited presidential power over the last four decades. If you are not sure of the limits placed on presidential overreach, or its staying power through the present time, how could you find out?
  4. Explore the ways that the Watergate scandal has changed the public perception of the presidency over the past 40 years.

Unit 10  The 1970’s: Ford and Carter

Objectives

Students will

  1. Reflect on the reading by having a class discussion on the main points, such as Ford’s pardon of Nixon, Ford’s “Whip Inflation Now” plan, and the energy crisis under Carter.
  2.  Provide details from the text as they make their points and they will be asked to relate what happened then to now. 
  3. Understand the reasons of the economic malaise in the United States during the 70’s

Unit 11 The 1980’s: Reagan and Bush                           

    Objectives

  1. To understand the programs and policies of Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush.

1.         Understand the goals of the New Right and the way this movement represented the concerns of many Americans of different backgrounds during the 1980s. Also, demonstrate understanding of the perspectives of those who opposed the New Right.

2.         Explain the priorities of Reagan’s administration and how his economic policies affected the nation. Describe “Reaganomics” both from the perspective of the president’s supporters and his critics. 3.         Describe the impact women had on the conservative movement. Also, summarize the election of 1980. Explain the key issues of the election and the significance of Reagan’s victory on US history

End of Semester I

First Examination

End of Semester II

Second Examination

The Second Semester is Devoted for Dissertation Writing

Continuous Assessment 50% Final Assessment Exam 50%